Guest Post: 5 Ingenious Ways to Grow Vegetables and Herbs Indoors

Hello everyone! 

I’m so happy to have the pleasure of sharing a great guest post with you today! Tim Graham, writer at www.yardandgardenduru.com has been kind enough to offer his advice on indoor gardening for us today! I thought this a perfect topic since winter is upon us and many of us who love to plant, and are at least learning how to do so (Hands up!) might have difficulty in the winter months. I hope you all get as much out of this as I have. Can’t wait to get that indoor garden started! Thank you, Tim for this great post!

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No matter how much space you have at home, it is still possible to grow vegetables and herbs. All that is required is a little ingenuity and a little thought, and you can be well on your way to having fresh produce on hand.

You also have a second benefit from growing in these smaller places. Your home looks chic and much more inviting.

Here are five vegetable gardening ideas that can help you on your way. They are not the ultimate as there are hundreds of ways you can adapt and change what you use to plant. So if you want to plant up, down, left or right there will be an option somewhere.

Window Boxes

These are easy to purchase and take no time to get ready and require very little skill or knowledge. It is good to see what you can grow in windows boxes before you continue:

  • Radishes
  • Leaf lettuce
  • Spinach
  • Green onions
  • Most Herbs (basil, thyme, parsley, sage, oregano, and chives)

There are a few tips that will help you obtain the very best from your window box:

  • Examine plant and seed packet labels to ensure the selection you choose will fit in your window box.
  • Your window box should be hung from a south-facing window if possible. This will allow your veggies and herbs to get as much sunlight as possible. If you are unable to do this, and a window will suffice your veggies yet might not get the same doses of sunshine.
  • Use high-quality potting soil. The roots will not be able to reach deeply into the soil to search for nutrients.
  • You should make sure your window box is well fertilized as there will be limited nutrients which will be used by your vegetables as they grow.

Patio Gardening

It is as if container gardening was made for patios. Your containers should be large enough that a few of them will fill the space you have. Ideally, they will be 12 inches deep which allows the roots to spread and take hold. The range of veggies you can grow in large containers is much more than a window box and can include:

  • Cucumbers
  • Bush beans
  • Lettuce
  • Potatoes
  • Carrots
  • Onions
  • Broccoli

Climbing plants can also be produced in containers. All you have to do is position these at the back or use poles that give them something to climb up. All soil care is the same as a window box apart from watering; your plants might need more frequent watering as containers pass water much quicker.

Hanging Baskets

These can go anywhere where you can hang them out of the way, be it a patio, balcony or in a bright area inside your home; the possibilities are endless. You might think you are limited to veggies that can be grown, yet some varieties thrive in these conditions.

A few that are possible are:

All herbs.

Tomatoes – some varieties have been created specifically for this purpose.

Strawberries – these can grow well in those partially shaded areas that you have.

The one significant difference for baskets is you have to use a good quality potting mix as the growing medium. This helps to reduce weight and to provide those much-needed nutrients.

As with the other options, watering and using fertilizer is crucial due to the basket size.

Vertical Pallet Gardens

These take up very little space as they grow vertically and can be hung or stand in any area. There are a few options of how to use a recycled pallet; this ranges from filling the whole thing with packed potting soil or adding landscape fabric to the bottom of each shelf that you will utilize. If you consider hanging one on the wall of your house, you should line the back with landscape fabric, black PVC and a sheet of thin plywood to prevent moisture from seeping backward.

You can also find the range of vegetables is quite considerable yet not limited to:

  • Peppers
  • Peas
  • Beans Lettuce
  • Basil
  • Mint
  • Strawberries

As with all the other ideas, potting soil and good fertilizer are recommended.

Gutter Gardens

These can be very cheap and quick to construct. They can also be hung or more often than not secured to a wall or a fence. Although any gutter can be used, it is advisable to opt for aluminum for strength reasons (especially if hanging).

If you have space 10-foot lengths are ideal. Here you fasten endcaps and secure them in place and drill a few small holes in the bottom side of the gutter at one end for drainage.

Again an excellent potting soil is advised for good root growth. One fastened to your area and filled with soil it is a matter of choosing the best vegetables to grow. Again you will be surprised what is possible. The following vegetables can be produced in a very cheap garden that you can hang 2 or 3 high against your chosen surface.

  • Lettuce, Salad Greens, Mustard, and Spinach
  • Radish and other small rooting vegetables (carrots or beets)
  • Strawberries
  • Snap peas
  • Garlic and Bunching Onions
  • Most Herbs (basil, thyme, parsley, sage, oregano, and chives)

About the Author – Tim Graham writes at YardandGardenGuru.com. He is passionate about gardening, yard care, and the tools. Outside of writing Tim usually finds himself knee-deep in lawn clippings, weeds, and grandchildren.

How do you do your indoor garden?

-Mliae

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6 Comments Add yours

  1. elitsastanevabritton says:

    Great!

    Apart from my flowers, I’ve tried with tomatoes and corn on our terrace.

    It’s amazing seeing plants grow from seeds, almost as awesome as looking at my daughter.

    New life!

    Have a nice day!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. mliae says:

      Totally! Have you had luck with the corn?
      Thank you so much for sharing! 😀

      Liked by 1 person

      1. elitsastanevabritton says:

        To be honest… No 😀 But I’ll keep trying 😉 Have a lovely day!

        Liked by 1 person

      2. mliae says:

        I can’t seem to make corn work here either! Please let me know if you find the secret! Have a lovely day to you too 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  2. Really interesting! I’ve been wanting to start growing my own herbs but had no idea what the best way was! Would love to try some cute window box herbs I will definitely be using your advice 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. mliae says:

      That’s great to hear! Thanks for your awesome comment 😀 Let us know how the window boxes go!

      Liked by 1 person

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