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Why I No Longer Write For Millionaire’s Digest

Millionaire’s Digest. Many of us are familiar with it. Its the site that has 100’s of likes within 1 hour of publishing a post. They were big. I haven’t seen them around in some time, but it may be because when I stopped submitting my work, I disconnected completely.

I was so excited to have my work published on the Millionaire’s Digest platform. Until … I understood their game.  It did not take many published posts for me to realise that this platform was just turning over posts in order to bring traffic. Meaning, that a post would go live, get loads of likes and then sink into oblivion – only to be posted again at a later time. When these posts were published again (or rescheduled?) all of the likes and comments from the 1st, 2nd, 3rd publishings were still there. Making it look like there were +400 likes, when actually it was only more like 20 for that publishing period. I would never had noticed this except when I reblogged my own posts to my site here at Lifexperiment Blog, it would become unviewable after several days. Quite frustrating.

And then it came….the biggest insult of all. I soon realised that Millionaire’s Digest didn’t accept me as a writer because I was good at it. They didn’t even care what I submitted. They just needed consistently revolving content. They did not seem to care if it was reliable information, good content, well considered, or a photo of a filthy toilet – they would take anything they could just get. Considering all the hours I had devoted to providing the platform well heavily researched, well-written, thoroughly cited content  – I felt used. Just a tiny piece in their big traffic-promoting machine. And it hurt. A lot. It was no longer an earned privilege to write for such a huge platform. It never was, even I was quite proud of myself for being accepted as a writer. Until I learned the game.

The game seemed clever in its simpleness. Beg people to create content for you, then post it, reschedule it for posting again, then again. The appearance of high traffic is there which generates even more traffic. Making it a perfect marketing machine. Anyone who doesn’t look deeper sees only a heavily ‘successful’ blog.

People have different motivations for blogging, and making money (attracting business marketing) is one of the biggest.  I understand. Money is difficult to get and getting paid to blog (actually paid – you know, where you can pay the bills or at least some of them) is like finding a unicorn. It can happen, but the rest of us are just imagining.

What bothers me about this plan is that it is so selfish and not caring about the people involved. You know, those people who spent so much time creating content for a site that was so self-thinking that we weren’t of importance. Just the workers there. Unpaid workers. Working for something we thought was great and was nothing more than a make money fast fraud for 1 guy.

I did google Millionaire’s Digest now and it seems that I am not the only writer that walked-away. I’m not sure if its even the same webpage, but it’s all new and there isn’t content anymore. Truthfully, you can still see the formatting posts – those fake ones.  It seems that a hard fall is what happens when you treat the people that are trying to help you, like rubbish.

If any bloggers are thinking about trying this – I would not suggest it.  Not only will it destroy any reputation you have as a human, but rescheduling your posts will badly mess with your SEO. All it takes is 1 person to click a link to your site that no longer exists, and the % is higher that they will never visit your site again.

Anyone else learning by bad experiences?

-Mliae

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9 Comments »

  1. This is a big reason I write for only me. I have had plenty of websites like this reach out to me, but I am not interested.
    If someone wants to publish my work they can pay me.

    Sorry, you didn’t have a good experience.

  2. I sorry your hard work was so abused, Mliae. I think there’s lots of sites out there that are doing, this (some of them huge and owned by large corporations) and not only with blogs, but with fiction, too. I agree with thelonelyauthorblog. I’m also making it my decision to only take paid writing and content creation jobs, and to only accept or offer guest posts to sites I trust.
    Also, when applying for paid writing and content creation jobs, many ask for ‘samples’ of jobs they have ongoing and sometimes get free labour. Why can’t they evaluate your work from your current writing? I now take that as a red-flag, too.

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